guthanna in éag

James McCloskey

Guthanna in Éag – an mairfidh an Ghaeilge beo?

A bilingual book setting out the world, linguistic and ecological perspectives on the Irish language.

7.60

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Product ID: 1059 ISBN: 978-1-901176-24-7. Categories: , , , , .

This book is available only as an e-book.

Bilingual book. A considered look at the current state of the Irish language. Our understanding of the particular situation of Irish is greatly enhanced by the world, linguistic and ecological perspectives which the author brings to the subject. James McCloskey is Professor of Linguistics at University of California, Santa Cruz. This book is the first fully bilingual publication from Cois Life Teoranta.

Liz Curtis, Irish Post, 15/12/01

McCloskey likens the early Irish state's efforts to beat the language into children to the earlier practice of beating English into them. He welcomes the creative diversity brought by speakers in Dublin and Belfast, and the children in gaelscoileanna. Irish is just one of many languages worthy of support, he says. The effort to support it is "fundamentally anti-nationalist", and is "one strand... in an international effort to open cracks in the dreary homogeneity of culture and ideology created by global capitalism."


The Irish Times, 13/04/01

McCloskey writes with concern about the ongoing destruction of languages throughout the world. Of the estimated 6,800 languages spoken at present ... it is thought that 90% will be dead within 100 years. Given the strength of English as a global force, shouldn't Irish speakers face the inevitable? "Well no, I don't think they should" he replies "The situation is like that of a farmer who is set to make a killing selling off his land to some giant property developer but who then discovers that the land is home to some rare and endangered species of bird or animal. There are moral issues here. Just think of all the stories, all the poems, all the jokes, all the histories, all the philosophies that simply become inaccessible if the languages go."